Articles/Blogs

  • Face it, You’re Toe-rrific!

    5/10/2014
    I am going to get personal this week: well, more personal than usual. I am also going to get random: well, more random than usual.

    I suffer from toenail fungus. Yes, it’s kind of gross. I have had the fungus for about ten years now. I wonder, how did it get there? I thought only older people are afflicted with such a condition. Well, I was wrong.

    What I believe caused my toenail fungus is bad habits. I would go to the gym and wear the same sweaty socks all day. When I got out of the shower, I did not dry my feet off with a blow dryer or towel. The toe fungus was a definite problem that I became aware of. It was not until this fall, about 10 years after it started accumulating, that I decided to do something about it, and be vigilant in my quest to cure my nails.

    I went to the store and bought an antifungal cream. Now, every single day, I get out of the shower, towel off, and then thoroughly blow dry my feet, take a toenail file and file my nails that have fungus to make them more porous, and then apply the antifungal cream. Then I place a Bandaid over the afflicted toes.

    Just this month, I have noticed that my nails are clearing up and most of them are devoid of fungus. Only a few still have a little bit left. Both my big toenails actually fell off and underneath them, the fungus is completely gone. New clear nails are growing in their places. I feel victorious.

    Now, there are other methods to cure toenail fungus, some of which include a pill and some even include using bleach and water. But I discovered what worked for me. I did not see any results for more than six months, but I knew that eventually my vigilance would pay off. It has.

    To me, toenail fungus can be like bad trapped energy in our body, including our organs. Yi Ren Qigong can help clear that pesky energy fungus out of our system and bring in more nourishing energy. However, this task could take a day, a week, a month, a year or even decades. The trick is to make Yi Ren Qigong a part of your daily routine. Many of us have seen or heard about people living in China who every morning, practice qigong and/or tai chi to help prepare them for their day. They might be on to something.

    So now I have confessed something unattractive about myself. In the past, it would be hard for me to divulge such things, which seems strange to me now. For instance, if my car had something wrong with it that I had the power to fix, why would I not fix it, or at least get a mechanic to fix it? From my experience, Yi Ren Qigong gives you the tools to fix things that are wrong with your body and also your spirit, psyche and mind.

    On a different note: Another thing I discovered this week is that one of the best ways to become happier is to not seek adulation or adoration from others, to not care too much what people think. Ultimately, you have to lose yourself in human form and find yourself in being form. You will never be happy if all you do is seek to fulfill the ego’s need to get approval from others. More and more I am losing my old self, and discovering my new self. This can be a scary process and I have had to endure some hardships along the way. One of our greatest fears can be of the unknown. This week, I will continue to repeat this mantra to myself when garbage thoughts come into my mind: Courage, Confidence, Strength and Faith. With dedication and vigilance, just like I whipped what seemed to be an impossible problem of curing my toenail fungus (some people live their entire lives with an unsightly yellow big toe, just as some people never get rid of bad, fungal, energy) I also have faith that I will cure myself of old, bad habits and negative behavior patterns, bringing myself back to my true self, unfettered by bad foreign energies.

  • How I became Captain America (sort of)

    5/4/2014

    What is a hero? To me a hero is many things. A hero can be anybody. This is because a hero is a person who overcomes his or her fears, works on weaknesses and optimizes his or her strengths in order to be the best person possible.

    During the last couple months, I have been watching a great deal of movies about fictitious comic-book heroes such as Iron Man, Spiderman, the Avengers and my favorite, Captain America. Why is he my favorite? It could be because I relate to him.

    No, I never was in the military, or even had a remote interest in being in the military. However, I was at one time energetically weak with a slight stature. I was not as scrawny as Captain America was before he became the subject of a military experiment to turn him into the ultimate American soldier. But I was skinny. I was about six feet tall and 140 pounds in high school (I even got down to almost 130 pounds at one point.) My basketball coaches and peers used to tease me all the time about my weight. Even though I ate like a horse and worked out, I could not gain weight very easily. So I quit sports out of frustration, and turned to other hobbies, such as music and writing.

    About that time, I was diagnosed with having a heart condition called Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP), in which the heart’s mitral valve does not always close properly. In my case, as in most cases, MVP is not life threatening. Although, coincidentally, when I was diagnosed with it at 16, Reggie Lewis of the Boston Celtics, who had the same condition, ended up dying from it. I was even in Boston on a family vacation at the time Lewis passed away. Sitting in a Boston Hotel room, watching the news about Lewis on television, I decided then I had to quit the game I loved. Although I had played in my high school’s select basketball program for four years and would probably have been on the junior varsity team and eventually varsity as a backup shooting guard (I was good, but not a star player) I just had a feeling I needed to stop playing. Sometimes I regret that decision, but it allowed me to spend more time concentrating on my other passions.

    Another basketball player, “Pistol” Pete Maravich (who I believe had he not injured his knee fairly early in his NBA career, would be more of a household name) was actually missing the left coronary artery of his heart. To me, it is amazing that he could even play basketball, let alone be a star player in college at LSU and in the NBA at Atlanta, New Orleans and Boston. Despite his rare heart defect, he became an incredible player and a true hero. Unfortunately, Maravich died young, at age 40, of heart failure, right after playing a pickup game.

    Despite my energetic and physical musculature shortcomings, I still worked out through college and after graduating in 2003 got up to a solid 165 lbs. with around 10 percent body fat. I was making progress with getting my muscles bigger and stronger, however, as was curious to me, I did not feel major improvements in my overall energetic levels and stamina. I thought I was just out of cardiovascular shape. However, it would not be until 2009, when I met Brendan Thorson, owner and instructor of the Noble School of Tai Chi and Qigong Training here in Seattle, Wa., that I would soon discover that weight training and cardio fitness were only part of the equation to becoming physically (and mentally) healthy. When I started taking classes from Thorson, I was fairly physically fit, but my stamina was not what I felt it could be.

    About a year after starting my Yi Ren Qigong training with Thorson, my energy levels increased dramatically, and my weight lifting performance improved as well. I gained more muscle mass and just as importantly my body began to feel less stiff and more flexible. I was integrating the physical body with the qi body and it felt amazing!

    This is not to say that muscle size is an indication of strength. In fact, in the world of Traditional Chinese Medicine, tendon health and vitality is given more consideration for developing strength. However, in my case, I set goals for what I wanted to look like physically, and those goals were not necessarily to look like a body builder, but to look physically fit with lean (cut) muscles which would allow me to live an active and healthy lifestyle. I finally went from being Steve Rogers (Captain America’s real name) to Captain America. I was not injected with some scientific serum, but with qi (chi), harnessed and channeled into not only my muscles, but my body’s organs, tendons and endocrine glands, all by practicing this powerful form of Qigong called Yi Ren Qigong.

    So whether you are a comic fan, a sports fan or just a fan of successful people, remember those who are touted as heroes—or those we admire—often had to overcome many obstacles in life to achieve their high stature. We often only see the end results of their hard work, and not what it took to get those results. Speaking of which, I have to get back to working on myself right now…Until the next time, this is your peaceful warrior signing off…Be well…

  • Integrating Thinking and Feeling = Productive Time

    4/27/2014

    I have been doing a lot of reading this week. Not all of the books I have been reading are related directly to Qigong—Yi Ren or other styles—but rather books about learning and design. In one book titled “The Design of Everyday Things” by Donald Norman, the author brings up an interesting point about learning.

    [People develop math phobias] not because the material is difficult, but because it is taught so that the difficulty in one stage hinders further progress The problem is that once failure starts, it soon generalizes by self-blame to all of mathematics. …The viscous cycle starts: if you fail at something, you think it is your fault. Therefore you think you can’t do that task. As a result, next time you have to do the task, you believe you can’t so you don’t even try. The result is that you can’t, just as you thought. You’re trapped in a self-fulfilling prophecy. (Norman, 1988).

    This excerpt got me thinking about how that concept applies to Yi Ren Qigong and the concept of worrying: worrying that I will fail, worrying that I will not make any progress, worrying that I will not be able to memorize or do the exercises correctly, and—worrying that I don’t have enough time!

    I don’t have enough time to practice Qigong because I have to (fill in the blank). But actually, what I find is that when I am not practicing Yi Ren Qigong I spend most of my free time worrying. Instead of worrying for almost an hour a day that I am not going to the gym, eating right, practicing Qigong, meditating enough and doing other healthy lifestyle habits, I have found that I should just practice these habits.

    For instance, for the next three months or so, I will be busier than the previous three months. However, in the previous three months, I fell behind in my Yi Ren Qigong practice. As a result, my overall well-being was not as balanced and I began to feel extremely stressed. Part of that stress was caused by knowing that I was not doing the things that keep me healthy. The thing is, balance is the key. Intellectual and business endeavors are important, however, as other Yi Ren Qigong practitioners have discovered, it is important to keep a balance between the mind, body and spirit: They all influence each other. And all of us have different needs. Take for instance this passage from the “Bhagavad Gita” Chapter 14 Text 5. “Because living entities have different kinds of bodies, in terms of the different aspects of nature, they are induced to act according to that nature. This is the cause of the varieties of happiness and distress.”

    All in all, we can think with our brains, but we have to remember that we can also think with our bodies. Our bodies can communicate a great deal of information to us. Some might call this kind of thinking “feeling” or “sensing.” This type of thinking is not considered intellectual, but it is just as import in your Yi Ren Qigong Practice. But don’t take my word for it: here is what renowned martial artist and Taoist Lineage Master Bruce Frantzis has to say about it in his book “Relaxing Into Your Being: The Water Method of Taoist Meditation.” Here he is discussing the Teacher/Student relationship and how a teacher can communicate knowledge to a student.

    “Although words and symbolic representations or images can allude to mind/body/spirit knowledge, the words themselves are rather like the shadow of the thing, rather than the thing itself….”(Frantzis, 1998).

    Frantzis goes on to say (and this is my own summation in my own words) that a teacher’s energy that resides in his or her body and ultimately mind (not non-verbal cues, but rather feelings of knowledge—knowledge energy if you will) can be transferred to a student and implanted in his or her subconscious as a sort of seed of knowledge. These seeds sprout knowledge that is often more clear than what can be described with words and usually appears to the student when he or she is ready.

    I bring this up because I, like many practitioners, have made the mistake of thinking that I can learn the concepts of Yi Ren Qigong much like, say, Mathematics (ie. I can read the concepts and do the exercises and therefore gain full knowledge). However, in my experience, much more knowledge is gained not by letting the intellectual material teach me about the exercises but rather the exercises leading me to knowledge about the intellectual material—the written words.

    So this week, I thought about worry and how useless it is in my life. Of course we all have our worries and concerns. However, I have found that the answers to some of my questions are often discovered by taking time away from the task at hand to practice Yi Ren Qigong. This can often lead to more clarity in my mind, and more clarity leads to being more productive.

    Sources:
    Norman, Donald A (1988). The Design of Everyday Things. New York, NY Basic Books.

    Frantzis, B.K. (1998). Relaxing Into Your Being: The Water Method of Taoist Meditatio Volume1, Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books.

  • Intent and Letting Go:

    4/20/2014

    I was lying on the couch, watching TV when I noticed that my right kidney area began to spasm vigorously. I have heard of this happening to other Yi Ren Qigong students, but never experienced it myself. It lasted about five minutes, off-and-on, and when it was through, I noticed that I felt much more relaxed and freer from the anxieties that had been ailing me throughout the week.

    My experience might have been similar to what an ancient Qigong practitioner might have felt when connections were being made between the body’s organs and certain emotions and virtues. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, some of the emotions that the kidneys are associated with are self-confidence, self-esteem, fear, willingness and inner freedom. When my kidneys (mostly the right kidney) began to spasm, my first reaction was that of worry, but as time went on, I noticed that I could actually feel my lower back loosen up and the area where my kidneys reside began to feel stronger, less vulnerable and relieved—as if I had released bad energy from them.

    I am currently taking the Level II Yi Ren Qigong class taught by Brendan Thorson. During the first session this week, we did an exercise that included the following mantra “I am ready to explore the inner world and I look forward to experiencing the process of internal healing and development. I will be growing stronger and wiser from this energy practice and enhancement.”

    To me this mantra has to do with intent. In the past, I have recited this mantra, but did not fully absorb the words and let myself believe in them. I noticed that as we repeated these words and I put my intent into believing them, that afterwards, the exercises seemed to penetrate Qi into my body on a deeper, more beneficial level. My conclusion is that if you let yourself go and trust that Yi Ren Qigong is a real therapeutic way to heal and nurture your mind, body and spirit, then then you will make greater positive strides in your practice and ultimately your life.

  • Fears and Limitations

    I was thinking about something seemingly trivial the other day: When I was a teenager, I had a friend who could do a backflip on a large backyard trampoline. When I was younger, it bothered me that I thought I could not do the same. I wondered, could I not do a backflip because I was too scared to attempt it, or I had physical limitations—my back not being flexible enough, or my legs not being strong enough, etc.—that disallowed me from successfully completing a full backflip?

    To me, now, this query does not cause me any personal distress. I have always been a pretty competitive person, and this is probably why I wanted to be able to do what my friend could do. However, I have since learned a few things about life. For one, you often choose your own battles. But even more importantly, there is a very fine line between fear and limitations and that those who are successful are not afraid to toe that line, often failing many times before finding success.

    However, you also have to incorporate into this equation costs and benefits: Is it worth taking the risk to complete the task? Let’s say that I attempted to do a backflip on a trampoline and my intuition was correct: my back is not flexible enough and I don’t have the type of coordination it takes to do a backflip on a trampoline. The result could be me severely injuring by body, including breaking my neck. However, let’s say that I successfully completed the backflip, overcoming my fear. All in all, a successful backflip really has no major impact on my own life. Therefore whether I attempt the feat or not does not matter and I get to choose my own battle. For the record, I have never attempted to do a backflip on a trampoline and because of the possible negative result, I have no desire to.

    On the other hand, I know that everything carries some measure of risks. For instance, I know that every time I write a piece of text or a piece of music, someone could have something negative to say about it, and that could upset me. But what are the costs and what are the benefits? If I write something that a critic or friend dislikes, that is a cost. However, that same piece could give a person an insight into his or her own life, and that person could make better life decisions as a result. In this situation, although I sometimes become fearful and feel vulnerable before writing something, I know that the potential negative costs are well worth the potential positive benefits.

    This whole thought process was spurred by what Michael Jordan stated during his controversial 2009 Basketball Hall of Fame Speech. Although his speech at times seemed rather pompous and self-absorbed, he did end it with something that has stuck with me. Jordan stated:

    “Although I’m recognized with this tremendous honor of being in the Basketball Hall of Fame, I don’t look at this moment as a defining end to my relationship with the game of basketball. It’s simply a continuation of something I started a long time ago. One day you might look up and see me playing the game at 50 [audience laughs]. Oh don’t laugh. Never say never, because limits (limitations) are often like fears—an illusion. “

    So starting this week, I personally pledge to stop negative self-talking myself out of doing things I desire and believe I have the capacity and facility to do. I could be wrong, but if I keep in mind the costs and benefits—the risks involved—and that failure is not a bad thing as it will steer me towards success, then what is to stop me? What is to stop you?

  • Perserverance

    Perseverance. That word can mean so much. I am not going to lie: I have seen many people reach a wall in their Qigong practice. Instead of taking a break or lessening the intensity of their practice, some people just quit altogether. I think that’s a huge mistake.

    I went to my first Yi Ren Qigong lesson in several months yesterday and I am sure glad that I did. Today, I feel stronger and more aware of what I need to do to continue to live a healthy life. Yi Ren Qigong along with tai chi and meditation will be a large part of the rest of my life. I know that through this spiritual journey that I will reach many obstacles and even feel like just going back to old programs and habits that don’t fix the problem and nourish my body and soul, but just act as an anesthetic, numbing the problem—not fixing it.

    In Level III yesterday, some of the exercises we practiced included re-directing our reproductive energies back into the body to nourish it and also, directing qi into the different glands of the endocrine system. I really felt the benefits to my endocrine system in my adrenal glands and thyroid. At the end of the class, my mind was much quieter and I felt more energetically balanced.

    I especially noticed that my kidneys sucked up the qi and my lower back, which had been a bit achy earlier in the day, felt stronger and free from pain. That is not to say that all I experienced during the lesson was pleasant: I did have moments of pain in my muscles and joints, but that subsided as the lesson continued. Some people have felt a great deal of pain the next day after a Yi Ren Qigong lesson. But this pain is not caused by the Qigong, but rather by the qi working through what could be old injuries or blocked qi along the acupuncture meridians…

    So my advice to those who are frustrated with their Qigong practice is to not give up! You will reach many hardships and obstacles along your Qigong journey, but if you persevere through them, the rewards are well worth you struggle…

    This is your Yi Ren Qigong friend, the Peaceful Warrior, signing off…

    Be well…
    The Peaceful Warrior.

  • Continuing Education for Acupuncturists, Massage Therapists and Bodyworkers

    Nationally Certified to give Continuing Education hours to Acupuncturists, Massage Therapists & Bodyworkers. 

    • Approved by the NCCAOM to give PDA points to Acupuncturists LAc. (East Asian Medicine Practitioner)
    • Approved by the NCBTMB to give CE (CEU) hours to Massage Therapists and Bodyworkers
  • School Gives Learning Structure

    By: Brian Kane

    “I believe that just as school gives learning structure in the academic institutions, attending Yi Ren Qigong classes also gives structure to your personal practice, enhancing it and in turn enhancing your overall health—both physical and mental.”

    Every day, I learn. Most of us do. We learn about facts and phenomena, but we also learn about ourselves: why we succeeded, why we failed. Through all of the trials and tribulations of learning, I have found that the two most detrimental things a person can do during the lesson of life are to let anger shut down your brain and obsess about how others view you.

    In the fall of 2013, I went back to school. The prospect of going back to school frightened me, at first. However, I knew that I could not let an opportunity to get trained in a field that I had a passion for pass me by. I was not getting the work I wanted, and part of the reason was that I needed more experience and schooling. With both my education path and school internships, I am currently getting both.

    I am doing well academically, receiving high marks and my work output satisfies me. However, my struggle matches my recent accomplishments. As I write this the day after the end of winter quarter, I can hardly believe I made it through the quarter’s course work. I took classes as part of my degree that involved material I had never seen before. As a result, I had to ask questions constantly, even at the risk of appearing stupid in front of my fellow classmates. In fact, I am certain that some of them thought that I was dumb and out of my element: The fact is, once I stopped caring about what others thought about me and once I gained the humility to admit that I was not completely absorbing the material, then I started doing much better.

    We all have different learning styles and rates, depending on the material, and I feel that some very smart and able people sell themselves short because they care too much about the opinions of others, including the teacher. All in all, and all things considered, most of us are of average intelligence—we might excel at certain things but when all areas of knowledge are considered, most of us are in the same range of intelligence, myself included. What I believe, is what makes successful people (people who are happy and satisfied with both their work and personal lives) is having a positive, proactive attitude and being able to take failures in stride.

    Exercising the mind is important, but
    Don’t Leave Out the Body!

    However, I have something to admit: Although I studied my school subjects intently and intensely, as the school quarter progressed, I neglected my Yi Ren Qigong practice more and more, eventually ceasing it altogether. My mind and body definitely was negatively affected by this. As Noble School of Tai Chi and Qigong Training owner Brendan Thorson has told me and other students, oftentimes people who are not active and/or do not practice some sort of spiritual work such as Qigong or Yoga, are too much in their heads and the body begins to suffer.
    From my own personal experiences at school, I have found that school stress can wreak havoc on the adrenal glands and the organ they sit on top of, the kidneys. This can lead to an unhealthy increase in the stress hormone cortisol and also to Adrenal Fatigue. (see article by Brendan Thorson: http://www.taichiqigongseattle.com/2012/01/balancing-hormones-for-improved-energy-yi-ren-qigong-medicine/)
    I believe that just as school gives learning structure in the academic institutions, attending Yi Ren Qigong classes also gives structure to your personal practice, enhancing it and in turn enhancing your overall health—both physical and mental. When I began school in the fall, I continued to practice Yi Ren Qigong, and I did not feel mentally or physically drained. Once I stopped practicing, I began to gradually notice that my mind was not as focused and would start racing, my energy levels became less and less, my digestive system began to be negatively affected and even my skin began to break out with a bit of acne, which I have not had in many years. As a side note: when I first started practicing Yi Ren Qigong, I suffered from eczema. My eczema would get worse, the more stress I had to endure. My eczema, at one time, completely went away. Although it did not fully return over the last few months, I did get a couple small blotches on my arms. According to Thorson, eczema could be a result of an imbalance of kidney qi.
    So what’s the overall takeaway? Balance, boldness and humility are keys to living a happy and successful life. To me, it seems that no matter how busy we are, it is vital to remain active physically, including practicing Qigong. Ironically, oftentimes when I feel the least able to practice Yi Ren Qigong, is when I need to practice it the most. Attending Yi Ren Qigong classes can greatly help motivate a person to continue to practice on his or her own, and just as importantly, remind that person about the value of practicing Yi Ren Qigong.

  • Classes & Seminars for February, March & April 2014

    Level 1, Part 1: Internal Qi-Activation & Cultivation

    (The Beginning point of entry for all new Yi Ren students): Yi Ren® Qigong

    See a Description of Level One: Internal Qi Activation & Development

    • Details – Late Winter

    • When: 3/15 & 3/16, 10am – 5:15pm
    • Where: 5623 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105.
    • How Long: 2/6hr. classes, with a one hour lunch each day

    Purchase Options

    $190 by 3/5
    $210 by 3/14
    $225 day of

    *$40 Discount for multiple family members, full time students & low income Senior Citizens. One discount per/ person. Pay regular price, send email with details and will receive refund via Pay Pal.

    Level 1, Part 2: Internal Qi-Activation & Cultivation

    (Minimum Completion of Level 1, part 1 Required): Yi Ren® Qigong

    See a Description of Level One: Internal Qi Activation & Development

    • Details – Spring

    • When: 4/26 & 4/27, 10am – 5:15pm
    • Where: 5623 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105.
    • How Long: 2/6hr. classes, with a one hour lunch each day

    Purchase Options

    $190 by 4/16
    $210 by 4/25
    $225 day of

    *$40 Discount for multiple family members, full time students & low income Senior Citizens. One discount per/ person. Pay regular price, send email with details and will receive refund via Pay Pal.

    Level One: Internal Qi Activation & Development

    (The beginning point of entry for all new Yi Ren Students): Yi Ren® Qigong

    See a Description of Level One: Internal Qi Activation & Development

    Details – Winter

    When: Thursdays 1/16 – 2/20, 7-9pm
    Where: 5623 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105.
    How Long: 6/2hr. classes
    Purchase Options

    $165 by 1/11

    $185 by 1/15

    $200 day of

    Details: Late Winter

    When: Thursdays 3/6 – 4/10, 7-9pm
    Where: 5623 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105.
    How Long: 6/2hr. classes
    Purchase Options

    $165 by 2/24

    $185 by 3/5

    $200 day of

    Late enrollment of weekly classes is available for new students–contact Brendan for details.

    *$30 Discount for multiple family members, full time students & low income Senior Citizens. One discount per/ person. Pay regular price, send email with details and will receive refund via Pay Pal.

    Level Two: Activating & Developing the Internal Organ Energy Pathways

    See a Description of Level Two: Activating & Developing the Internal Organ Energy Pathways

    (Completion of Level 1 required) Yi Ren® Qigong

    Details – Winter

    When: Wednesdays 1/15 – 2/19, 7- 9pm
    Where: 5623 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105
    How Long: 6/2hr. Classes
    Purchase Options

    $165 by 1/10

    $185 by 1/14

    $200 day of

    Details – Late Winter

    When: Wednesdays 3/5 – 4/9, 7- 9pm
    Where: 5623 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105
    How Long: 6/2hr. Classes
    Purchase Options

    $165 by 2/23

    $185 by 3/4

    $200 day of

    Late enrollment of weekly classes is available for new students–contact Brendan for details.

    *$30 Discount for multiple family members, full time students & low income Senior Citizens. One discount per/ person. Pay regular price, send email with details and will receive refund via Pay Pal.

    Moving With Qi: Qigong w/ Taichi Style Movements

    See a Description of Moving With Qi: Qigong w/ Taichi Style Movements

    For Internal & External Strength & a Peaceful Mind(Completion of Level 2 or instructor permission required) Yi Ren® Qigong

    Details – Winter

    When: Tuesdays 1/14 – 2/18, 7:30- 9:30pm
    Where: 5623 University Way NE Seattle, WA 98105
    How Long: 6/2hr. Classes
    Purchase Options

    $165 by 1/9

    $185 by 1/13

    $200 day of

    Late enrollment of weekly classes is available for new students–contact Brendan for details.

    *$30 Discount for multiple family members, full time students & low income Senior Citizens. One discount per/ person. Pay regular price, send email with details and will receive refund via Pay Pal.
    Jing & Rou: Muscle & Tendon Qigong

    View Description of Jing & Rou: Muscle & Tendon Qigong

    Development of the Yang Energy Body: For Strength, Protection and Internal Peace

    (Completion of Level Two required) Yi Ren® Qigong

    Details – Late Winter

    When: Tuesdays 3/4 – 4/8, 7:30- 9:30pm
    Where: 5623 University Way NE Seattle, WA 98105
    How Long: 6/2hr. Classes
    Purchase Options

    $165 by 2/22

    $185 by 3/3

    C. $200 day of

    Late enrollment of weekly classes is available for new students–contact Brendan for details.

    *$30 Discount for multiple family members, full time students & low income Senior Citizens. One discount per/ person. Pay regular price, send email with details and will receive refund via Pay Pal.

    Level Three: Activation of the Extraordinary Meridians

    View Description of Level Three: Activation of the Extraordinary Meridians

    Development of Brain, Endocrine & Nervous System & Energy Protection Network

    (Completion of Level 2 required) Yi Ren® Qigong

    Details – Winter

    When: Mondays 1/13 – 2/24, 7- 9pm (No Class Presidents Day)
    Where: 5623 University Way NE Seattle, WA 98105
    How Long: 6/2hr. Classes
    Purchase Options

    $165 by 1/8

    $185 by 1/12

    $200 day of

    Details – Late Winter

    When: Mondays 3/3 – 4/7, 7- 9pm
    Where: 5623 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105
    How Long: 6/2hr. Classes
    Purchase Options

    $165 by 2/21

    $185 by 3/2

    $200 day of

    Late enrollment of weekly classes is available for new students–contact Brendan for details.

    *$30 Discount for multiple family members, full time students & low income Senior Citizens. One discount per/ person. Pay regular price, send email with details and will receive refund via Pay Pal.

  • Sunday February 23, Elixer Field & Kidney Qigong for Self-Healing & Self-Care

    Sunday, February 23 at East West Bookshop Seattle

    1-2:30pm in Tea Garden $10
    Register Now!

    Over the past 5,000+ years the ancient Taoists discovered many secrets to healing and maintaining one’s health. Now many of these secrets are available to you from Yi Ren® Qigong! In this introductory class you will learn to activate your energy field and your internal energy system. We will focus on the activation and balancing of the Elixir Field (Dantian) and the Kidney Energy Centers. Join Yi Ren Qigong instructorBRENDAN THORSON, LMP, of The Noble School of Taichi & Qigong Training to begin your journey.

    “Yi Ren Qigong healed my body and aligned my spirit. I started this practice over two years ago and am still amazed at the unfolding benefits that I feel. This practice has calmed my mind and given me increased spiritual clarity. My back has been dramatically healed after trying everything from pain killers to chiropractic work. I quit smoking cigarettes thanks to the deepening awareness of my body. I am stronger and more present in my body thanks to the increased connection to higher realms and the earth.”–Michael, Healer & Shaman

    A Vibrant Elixir Fieldis essential for one to maintain Powerful Regeneration Energies throughout life for enhanced vitality, longevity and creativity. The Elixir Field is our energy source for Self-Healing, Personal Growth and Spiritual Development. While the Kidneys are our Internal Power Station and having powerful kidney energy is necessary for one to have a strong and healthy body and mind. The kidneys are related to the strength of the bones and bone marrow.

    + Activation of the Kidney fire energies is a key to the activation of the Elixir Field
    + Deeper internal connection between the Kidneys and the Elixir Field enhances one’s internal healing powers
    + Our Elixir Field is more or less like our Energetic Bank Account–thus we want to keep our energetic bank account full so we will have the energy to live a full life. Just like one wants to have plenty of money saved for retirement. “In my experience, one’s energetic bank account is even more important than one’s financial bank account because you can always earn money if you are strong and healthy, but you cannot enjoy your life regardless how much money you have if you do not have your health.”

    Additional Benefits from the Development of the Elixir Field:
    + Help women get over premenopausal symptoms
    + Center to nourish our Motherly energies
    + Connects to the Moon energies

    Brendan has ongoingLevel 1 training and upcoming seminars

    Brendan has had articles published inQi Magazine:The Journal of Traditional Health and Fitness.

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